ABOUT THE PRESENTERS

Larry Fink. All rights reserved.

Larry Fink. All rights reserved.

Larry Fink was the juror for the PMW Festival  2016 Juried Exhibit. He is a professional photographer of 45 years with one man shows at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Musee de la Lausanne Photographie in Belgium, and the Musee de l’Elysee in Switzerland, among others. He was twice awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, and National Endowment for the Arts Individual Photography Fellowship twice. He is currently a professor of photography at Bard College in upstate New York.

Barbara Tannenbaum. All rights reserved by Andrew McAllister.

Barbara Tannenbaum. All rights reserved by Andrew McAllister.

Barbara Tannenbaum is Curator of Photography at the Cleveland Museum of Art. She was Chief Curator at the Akron Art Museum from 1985 through 2011, growing the photography collection from 500 to 2,500 works and organizing over 85 exhibitions. These included co-curating the first large-scale international exhibition chronicling women’s achievements in fine art photography and the 1991 Ralph Eugene Meatyard retrospectives. Dr. Tannenbaum has authored numerous publications including major books on Ralph Eugene Meatyard (Rizzoli) and has lectured throughout the U.S., Canada, and China. She serves on the Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Foundation board.

David Travis. All rights reserved by David Travis,

David Travis. All rights reserved by David Travis,

David Travis was Curator of Photography at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1972 until 2008, directing programs, acquisitions, and over 125 photography exhibitions. He was the founding curator of the Department of Photography in 1975, and directed and designed the major state-of-the art renovation of the galleries, study room, laboratory, and vaults in 1982. In 2002 he was named a “Chicagoan of the Year” by the Chicago Tribune Arts critic. His lectures and essays were published in At the Edge of the Light: Thoughts on Photographers and Photography, on Talent and Genius.

Andy Kraushaar has held the position of Visual Materials Curator at the Wisconsin Historical Society since 2001. Prior to this he worked as a freelance photographer before entering library school, receiving a degree with an emphasis in archives administration. After brief internships at the Library of Congress, Print & Photographs Division, and the Smithsonian Institution Archives, he returned to Wisconsin in 1988 to as manuscript processing archivist at the Wisconsin Historical Society.
 

 

Bob Thall is a Chicago photographer specializing in street scenes. He is the former Chair of the Photography Department at Columbia College Chicago, stepping down in 2011. His photographs, of gritty urban street scenes, have been exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He won the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship for photography in 1998.

Publications include At City's Edge: Photographs of Chicago's Lakefront, On City Streets: Chicago, 1964-2004 , City Spaces: Photographs of Chicago Alleys, The New American Village, and The Perfect City (Creating the North American Landscape).

Family photo

Family photo

IN HONOR OF JOSEPH JACHNA (1935-2016)

Jachna photographs in the Art Institute of Chicago collection

Born in Chicago in 1935, the late Joseph D. Jachna did his undergraduate and graduate work at the renowned Institute of Design (ID) at the Illinois Institute of Technology under the tutelage of both Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. Their influence is evident in many of his black and white photographs, particularly those in which he portrays the landscape as an abstracted composition with a graphic impact or a refined sense of formal order. Nevertheless, Jachna pursued a number of distinctive interests of his own throughout his career, both in terms of subject matter and experiments with form.

For three years while at the ID, Jachna worked on an in-depth study of water, and he has returned to this theme at various times since then. In the late 1960s and 70s, for example, Jachna made a number of meditative, atmospheric photographs of black expanses of water or the motion of river currents. In other cases, as in his images of snow next to open water or ice, a tightly framed composition makes for pronounced juxtapositions of light and dark shapes.

In a substantial body of work created in Door County, Wisconsin, Jachna takes a more idiosyncratic direction. Using hand-held mirrors to disrupt the photograph's depiction of a landscape, Jachna inserts his own body into the image or uses the mirror's reflection and the camera's lens to elegantly rearrange the natural environment into a view unavailable to the naked eye. While these images are often highly formal, they also touch on ideas ranging from the relationship of man and nature to the ways in which the camera mediates how we see. After completing his formal studies, Jachna taught alongside Siskind at the Institute of Design until 969 when he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago.